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Athenaeum Reservations for CMC Alumni and Parents

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Monday February 25
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Readings and Reflections: An Evening with Joyce Carol Oates
Award winning writer, essayist, poet, and novelist Joyce Carol Oates will read from her works, including her newest works, and share personal reflections.
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$20.00
 
Tuesday February 26
11:45 AM - 1:00 PM
Love, Death, Infidelity, Friendship, Aging, Greed, and the Workings of Fate
Henri Cole, the Josephine Olp Weeks Professor of Literature at Claremont McKenna College, will read from his poetic works.
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$17.50
 
Tuesday February 26
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
The Volume of Small Voices: How Consumers Forced Agriculture to Change Antibiotic Use
In the early 1950s, farmers began adding small doses of antibiotics to the diets of livestock. The drugs caused animals to put on weight more quickly and protected them against diseases, laying the foundation for modern intensive meat production. But they also fostered the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria that has become a profound human health threat. Maryn McKenna, independent journalist specializing in public health, global health, and food policy, will recount how reversing that mistake not only took decades of research and policy maneuvering, but the power of consumer coalitions to force the meat industry to change its practices.
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$20.00
 
Wednesday February 27
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
The Cultivation of Compassionate Reasoning as a New Approach to Conflict Resolution, Genocide Prevention, and Human Rights Training
Compassionate reasoning offers a new approach to address the cognitive and emotive foundations for progress in conflict management, genocide prevention, and the evolution of human rights. Using illustrative experiences in contemporary Syria, Marc Gopin, director at George Mason University’s Center for World Religions, Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution will discuss the roles of religious people, especially women, and the demonstrated importance of cognitive and emotive approaches to alliance building and recovery He will explain why some cutting-edge work in neuroscience and cognitive psychology can be helpful in intervention, in coping with major catastrophes, and with life inside police states; he will also explore relevance to current challenges of destructive conflict in the United States.
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$20.00
 
Thursday February 28
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
A New Cold War? China-US Friction in a New Era
Sino-US relations have fundamentally changed under Presidents Xi Jinping and Donald Trump. Jamil Anderlini, The Financial Times’ Asia editor, will explore where things are headed and what it all means for Asia and the world.
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$20.00
 
Thursday February 28
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Dalit Question and Politics in the 2000s
With a reorientation from the desire for social justice to economic aspiration, two rapid shifts are visible in the political preferences of Dalits in India’s northern state of Uttar Pradesh. Attracted by promises of development and cultural inclusion, the Dalits--previously referred to more generally as "Untouchables"--were drawn away from the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) towards the dominant and nationalist BJP in the 2014 elections. But since 2015, violent protests by Dalits across India against rising atrocities point to disillusionment with the BJP. Sudha Pai, a political science scholar and researcher, will address these changing equations which indicate fragmentation between Ambedkarite and Hindutvawadi Dalits with consequences for the "Dalit Question" and the 2019 Indian elections.
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$20.00
 
Monday March 4
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Who's the Fairest of Them All? The Truth About Opportunity, Taxes, and Wealth in America
Stephen Moore, economic policy analyst at CNN and economic advisor to candidate Donald Trump, will explore what it means for our economic system and our economic results to be "fair." Does it mean that everyone has a fair shot? Does it mean that everyone gets the same amount? Does it mean the government can assert the authority to forcibly take from the successful and give to the poor? Is government supposed to be Robin Hood determining who gets what? Or should the market decide that?
Registration
Online registration for this event will open on Friday, February 22. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Alumni & Parent Engagement at (909) 621-8097.
Monday March 4
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Poetry Reading and Reflections with Carl Phillips
Poet and author Carl Phillips, professor of English and of African and Afro-American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, will read some of his award-winning poetry and share personal reflections.
Registration
Online registration for this event will open on Friday, February 22. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Alumni & Parent Engagement at (909) 621-8097.
Tuesday March 5
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Finding the Good: Reclaiming and Reframing Rwanda
The only American to remain in Kigali, Rwanda throughout the 1994 genocide, Carl Wilkens ventured out each day into streets crackling with mortars and gunfire and worked his way through roadblocks of angry, bloodstained soldiers and civilians armed with machetes and assault rifles in order to bring food, water and medicine to groups of orphans trapped around the city. Working with Rwandan colleagues, they helped save the lives of hundreds. His harrowing yet hopeful journey weaves together stories of tremendous risk and fierce compassion in the midst of senseless slaughter and promotes how to "enter the world of the Other."
Registration
Online registration for this event will open on Friday, February 22. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Alumni & Parent Engagement at (909) 621-8097.
Wednesday March 6
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
How Muslims Discovered America
Historically, Muslim geographers described and mapped the world not only to render it known, but also to marvel at its unknowability. Starting in the early 16th century, accounts and maps drawn from Iberian materials on the Americas began to occasion notable shifts in Islamic geographical writing and cartography. Importantly, the language of discovery also came to play a role in triumphalist Christian discourses on Muslim inferiority and insularity. Beginning in the early 20th century, an array of Muslim scholars, politicians, and religious authorities started to claim that Muslim seafarers preceded Columbus in the discovery of America. Travis Zadeh, associate professor of religious studies at Yale University, explores the various motivations guiding revisionist history in light of modern debates over the nature, significance, and scope of Islamic geography and the place of Muslims in the development of science and the course of world history.
Registration
Online registration for this event will open on Friday, February 22. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Alumni & Parent Engagement at (909) 621-8097.
Thursday March 7
5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Constructing Freedom of Speech: Lessons from the Unwritten Constitution
Is a law that makes it illegal to engage in speech that “defames” the government or brings it into “disrepute” unconstitutional? In 1798, when the Sedition Act was passed, the answer was not obvious. Seven years earlier in 1791, when the First Amendment was added to the Constitution, there had been no discussion of what “the freedom of speech” meant. The Sedition Act of 1798 forced the new republic to confront the nature and meaning of freedom of speech under the Constitution. George Thomas, Wohlford Professor of American Political Institutions and director of the Salvatori Center at Claremont McKenna College, asserts that understanding one of our first great constitutional conflicts illuminates contemporary debates about constitutional interpretation and the importance of constitutional engagement by citizens.
Registration
Online registration for this event will open on Friday, February 22. If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Alumni & Parent Engagement at (909) 621-8097.
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Event registration summary
Joyce Carol Oates:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Henri Cole (LUNCH):
Lunch
0
$17.50
Maryn McKenna:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Marc Gopin:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Jamil Anderlini:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Sudha Pai:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Stephen Moore:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Carl Phillips:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Carl Wilkens:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Travis Zadeh:
Dinner
0
$20.00
George Thomas:
Dinner
0
$20.00
Donation:
$0.00
Total:
$
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